United Nations Great Lakes Strategy uses ISACS to ensure harmonized regional approach to small arms control

GreatLakes

The countries covered by the strategy are the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania

EXCERPT FROM UN SECURITY COUNCIL DOCUMENT S/2016/255 (17 March 2016):
Letter from the Secretary-General to the President of the Security Council transmitting the
United Nations Great Lakes Regional Strategic Framework 2016-2017

Pillar 6: JUSTICE AND CONFLICT PREVENTION
Priority Regional Interventions

2. Strengthen regional efforts to increase controls over the supply side of small arms and light weapons

Small arms and light weapons are a major contributor to the conflict in the Great Lakes region. Working in partnership with the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa and the Regional Centre on Small Arms in the Great Lakes Region, the Horn of Africa and Bordering States to ensure a harmonized regional approach to stockpile management practices and particularly leakages from state stockpiles; adequate marking and record keeping; collection of illicit and unwanted weapons, destruction of collected arms and surplus weapons. The regional intervention will also utilize International Small Arms Control Standards in conducting assessments of existing small arms controls in countries in the region and identifying and prioritizing support needs, in order to move all countries in the region closer to compliance with international standards and ensuring harmonization of national controls and legislation. [emphasis added] [end excerpt]


In a Presidential Statement responding to the Great Lakes Strategic Framework, the President of the Security Council stated that:

“The Security Council takes note of  the priority “Interventions” set in the RSFGLR [Regional Strategic Framework for the Great Lakes Region] to strengthen institutions, mechanisms and capacities for conflict prevention, management, resolution and peace building, through  cross-border initiatives and partnerships at the regional level, including […]; strengthen regional efforts by increasing controls on the supply of small arms and light weapons  which are a major source of conflict in the Great Lakes region;…”  


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