UN Secretary-General outlines achievements of ISACS

Excerpt from:
"The illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects and assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them: 
Report of the Secretary-General" (A/72/122)

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres
UN Photo/Mark Garten

17. The International Small Arms Control Standards provide practical guidance on ways to put in place effective national controls over the full life cycle of small arms and light weapons, in order to reduce the risk of their falling into the hands of criminals, terrorists or others who would misuse them.

18. The International Small Arms Control Standards contribute directly to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, specifically target 16.1 to “significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere” and target 16.4 to “significantly reduce illicit ... arms flows”. Building national capacities for combatting illicit arms trafficking is essential to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (see A/70/794, para. 46), and States are encouraged to use the Standards to support peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts and to conduct national self-assessments of the effectiveness of existing small arms and light weapons controls (see A/71/438-A/CONF.192/BMS/2016/1, recommendation 8).

19. Advocacy by regional organizations, in particular the European Union, the African Union and the Caribbean Community, has resulted in the International Small Arms Control Standards being used in more than 100 countries. In addition, recent innovative uses of the Standards, for example to assess the safety and security of a floating armoury in the Gulf of Oman, have demonstrated their versatility.

20. In the course of 2016, Governments, regional organizations and non-governmental organizations used the International Small Arms Control Standards extensively in trainings designed to build national capacity on small arms and light weapons control. Germany used the Standards to train physical security and stockpile management specialists from 11 participating States of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. The Regional Centre on Small Arms and Light Weapons in the Great Lakes Region, the Horn of Africa and Bordering States trained security officials from Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda on Standards-based stockpile management. The Pacific Small Arms Action Group trained 30 security officials from Fiji on the Standards. Trainings conducted by the South Eastern and Eastern Europe Clearinghouse for the Control of Small Arms and Light Weapons for Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, the Republic of Moldova and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, as well as a training conducted by the Bonn International Centre for Conversion in Mali, introduced the Standards guidance on physical security and stockpile management.

21. The United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa used the International Small Arms Control Standards to help to build the physical and security stockpile management capacity of six countries in the Sahel (Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Nigeria). The United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean used the Standards to help to prevent the diversion of small arms from private security companies in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Peru. The United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific used them to help to strengthen small arms control in Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand. Austria used the Standards to transfer specialized knowledge to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kenya, the Republic of Moldova and Senegal, and the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research used the Standards in its support for the Federal Government of Somalia.

22. The International Small Arms Control Standards have made important contributions to the harmonization of United Nations programmes on small arms and light weapons control and constitute a good example of how the humanitarian, peace and security and development pillars of the United Nations can work together in partnership to help States to prevent conflict.4 They provide comprehensive guidance on the acquisition, possession and use of firearms by civilians (see A/HRC/32/21). The Great Lakes Regional Strategic Framework 2016-2017 (S/2016/255, annex) used the Standards to ensure a harmonized approach to small arms and light weapons control in five countries in the region (Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania).

23. The International Small Arms Control Standards Inter-Agency Support Unit trained government and United Nations Development Programme officials from Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, the Niger, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as officials from Togo and the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa, to use the International Small Arms Control Standards Assessment Tool to compare existing national controls on small arms and light weapons with international standards in order to identify and prioritize areas that may be in need of strengthening.

FULL REPORT — The illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects and assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them: Report of the Secretary-General (A/72/122)