ISACS features prominently in Secretary-General’s report to General Assembly

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EXERPT FROM THE REPORT:

"International Small Arms Control Standards

"38. Under the leadership of Office for Disarmament Affairs and UNDP, 23 entities within the Organization’s internal Coordinating Action on Small Arms mechanism are working with leading experts worldwide to develop and implement International Small Arms Control Standards to provide practical guidance on translating global norms and commitments regarding the regulation of small arms into concrete action at the national level. The standards, which are voluntary, (see www.smallarmsstandards.org) propose effective and achievable cradle-to-grave controls over small arms and light weapons — from manufacture and marking, through transfer and storage, to collection and destruction — in order to reduce the risk that they may fall into the hands of criminals, terrorists and others who would misuse them.

"39. Since the launching of the standards in 2012, the number of actors using them and the number of countries in which they are being used has continued to grow. The United Nations, international and regional organizations, civil society organizations and training institutes have used the standards to assist the Governments of more than 50 countries in Africa, the Asia-Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean and South-East Europe in improving their national controls over small arms and light weapons. The launch of the assessment tool for the use of the standards and subsequent capacity-building initiatives conducted throughout the world have further supported their adoption and use, aiding and advancing the conduct of comprehensive assessments of small arms control measures and needs.

"40. Because the standards were used as the basis of assistance on small arms control, beneficiary Governments received consistent and high quality advice and guidance, reflecting internationally recognized effective practices for controlling small arms and light weapons to prevent their diversion and misuse. This support contributes directly to efforts by Governments to reduce armed violence and build community security in order to create the conditions necessary for sustainable human development.

"41. The widespread use of the standards demonstrates that they are achieving key goals: to become widely recognized as a practical tool for strengthening national controls over the full lifecycle of small arms and light weapons. This was further demonstrated in 2014 during the Fifth Biennial Meeting of States to Consider the Implementation of the Programme of Action, at which 67 States called for the wider application of the standards, and when the Security Council recognized, in its resolution 2220 (2015), the value of the application of the standards in guiding effective physical security and stockpile management practices.

"42. The partners in the Coordinating Action on Small Arms mechanism will continue to work with governmental policymakers and practitioners, as well as with international and regional organizations, civil society organizations and the private sector, to make full use of the International Small Arms Control Standards when designing small arms control programmes, monitoring their progress and evaluating their impact.”


READ FULL REPORT — Assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them; and the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects: Report of the Secretary-General